Skillet Apple Crisp

This tastes like a hug. I prefer apple crisp to apple pie. I love everything going on in a crisp: nuts, crunchy bits, chewy oats, tart apples and sweet syrupy juices. Pie always disappoints me, crisps never do.

I think it’s been super fun to have apples in our winter CSA shares.

There are literally millions of apple crisp recipes out there. I really like this one because you dump all the filling ingredients in the skillet and cook it until the apples are done.

At our altitude, when making apple pie it is really hard to cook the apples until they are done. If you add flour or any thickener it often isn’t cooked all the way. This apple crisp solves those problems. Also, you can taste the filling and adjust it if you want  the filling sweeter or more lemon or spices. I was happy with my filling cooked down to this point.

I topped it with the crumble and baked it until it was crisp. I don’t know why I always leave a hole in the middle of my crisps, but I do. Maybe my mom did it? You can cover the whole thing if you want.

I also don’t know where I got this recipe but I’ve used it for decades. It’s got the perfect amount of apples to topping for me. If you make it I hope you like it as much as I do.

My Apple Crisp Recipe

Topping

 3/4 cup flour, any kind. I used whole wheat. Gluten free works fine.

 3/4 cup chopped nuts (optional)

 3/4 cup old-fashioned rolled outs

 1/2 cup packed light brown sugar

 1/4 cup granulated sugar

 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

 1/2 teaspoon table salt

 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter melted

 

Filling

 3 pounds apples, peeled, cored, cut into chunks

 1/4 cup granulated sugar

 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional)

 1 cup apple cider or juice

 2 teaspoons juice from 1 lemon

 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

 

Preparation

Make the topping: Adjust the oven rack to the middle position and heat oven to 450 degrees. Combine flour, nuts, oats, brown sugar, granulated sugar, cinnamon, and salt in a medium bowl. Stir in butter until mixture is thoroughly moistened and crumbly. Set aside while preparing the fruit filling.

Make the filling: Put all the filling ingredients into a skillet (mine was an 8 inch skillet) and carefully mix everything over a medium heat on the stove. It will slowly collapse and cook down. When the apples are cooked to your liking sprinkle the topping evenly over fruit, breaking up any large chunks. Place skillet on baking sheet (incase it spills over) and bake topping is deep golden brown, 20 – 25 minutes. Cool at least 15 minutes before you eat.

Happy thanksgiving. Stay warm and well.

Mo

Posted in 2020, Apples, Recipes | 1 Comment

Winter CSA Week 5

Hello CSA Members!

Tuscan Kale

Here is what we *hope* to bring you for Week 5 of our Winter CSA:

REGULAR SHARE
Carrots
Potatoes
CHOICE: Winter Radish OR Kohlrabi
Onions
Garlic
Turnips
Greens CHOICE (Possibly Kale OR Spinach)
Butternut Squash

LARGE SHARE ADDITIONS
None for Winter CSA

FRUIT SHARE
Apples

Posted in 2020, Farm, Newsletter | Leave a comment

Winter CSA Week 4

Hello CSA Members!

Here is what we *hope* to bring you for Week 4 of our Winter CSA:

REGULAR SHARE
Carrots
Potatoes
CHOICE: Cabbage OR Kohlrabi
Onions
Garlic
Spinach
Kale
New England Pie Pumpkin

LARGE SHARE ADDITIONS
None for Winter CSA

FRUIT SHARE
Apples

Posted in 2020, Farm, Newsletter | Leave a comment

Cheesy Roasted Pepper Mashed Potatoes

This is one of my favorite Thanksgiving dishes. I’ve never shared any holiday food with you on the blog. Now, with the winter CSA I’ll get to! Roasted chilies added to mashed potatoes are so good with turkey and dressing and cheese makes everything better.

We had a ton of peppers this summer didn’t we? I hope you stashed a few of the roasted chilies away in the freezer to enjoy this winter.  You can use any of the roasted peppers we gave you in mashed potatoes. I used some mild Anaheim. Poblano are great in mashed potatoes if that is what you have.

Cheesy Roasted Pepper Mashed Potatoes

Serves 1…just kidding. This serves at least 4 and probably more like 6.

  • 1 1/2 pounds potatoes
  • 4 or 5 roasted chilies cleaned and diced
  • 1 cup milk/cream/1/2 & 1/2
  • 1/2 to 1 cup cheese to taste
  • sour cream to taste
  • salt and pepper

Put potatoes in a large pot and cover with salted water. Cook the potatoes over medium-heat until fork tender, about 15  to 25 minutes start checking them after 15 minutes. When tender, drain and return the potatoes to the pot. Add the sour cream, milk, butter, cheese, salt, pepper. Mash by hand with a potato masher  and add the roasted peppers at the end of mashing and adjust seasoning, if needed.

This is after they are fork tender and before mashing, you can’t see the milk in the pan, but it’s there.

Add the peppers when you are done mashing, just stir them in.

That’s it. Of course these are great anytime, not just Thanksgiving. If you have leftovers they make delicious potato pancakes or to die for potato croquettes .

Have a great week. Enjoy this gorgeous weather.

Mo

Posted in 2020, Peppers, Potatoes, Recipes | Leave a comment

Beet and Lentil Borscht

Delicious. Satisfying. Chocked full of vegetables. Filling. Beautiful.

I followed this recipe exactly, it’s well written and easy to follow so I am not going to rewrite it. I’ll just link to the the post and post some of my pictures making it.

You probably have all the vegetables you need in your refrigerator. I did. I have made this with sauerkraut instead of cabbage, that was really good too.

Chop everything up. The mandolin came in handy here, but you can chop by hand if you like.

Chuck it all in a big pot with the lentils and the other ingredients called for and cook for about 30-40 minute.

The vegetables release lots of water and make a delicious broth, it’s almost like a vegetables stew. The lentils add a nice satisfying texture. This can be vegan if you use vegetable oil and top it with olive oil. I like it with some crusty bread or croutons and sour cream so darn good. I do think it needs some kind of fat to top it off to balance the flavors.

It gets better after a day or two and it makes at least 8 servings, so lunch is taken care of for a few days.

I hope you are all well and stay that way.

Mo

Posted in 2019, Beets, Cabbage, Recipes | Leave a comment

Winter CSA Week 3

Hello CSA Members!

Here is what we *hope* to bring you for Week 3 of our Winter CSA:

REGULAR SHARE
Beets
CHOICE: Kohlrabi OR Hakurei Turnips
Potatoes
Leeks
Spinach
Arugula
Red Kuri Squash

LARGE SHARE ADDITIONS
None for Winter CSA

FRUIT SHARE
Apples

Posted in 2020, Farm, Newsletter

2 Easy Acorn Squash Preparations

Acorn squash are a perfect side dish to go with almost any meal. They have a very mild ‘squash’ taste and aren’t as sweet as butternut squash or pumpkins.

The skin is edible, I like it. Some people don’t. I’ll show you two ways to cook it, one you scoop the flesh out the other you eat it skin and all. Try both and see which you prefer.

Like most winter squash, acorn squash are very hard to cut. Before cutting your squash, then you can microwave winter squash for about 3 minutes to make them easier to cut.

Cut it in half and scoop out the seeds, use a melon ball utensil or a grapefruit spoon to make the scooping easier.

I roast all my winter squash in a 425F oven and start checking for doneness after about an hour. If the squash is cut in smaller pieces check for doneness sooner, like 35 or 40 minutes. It’s pretty hard to over cook squash.

Put your squash on a sheet pan lined with parchment. I like acorn squash sweet since they are pretty bland so I put in a pad of butter and some maple syrup or a little brown sugar and salt and pepper. If you don’t want sweet you can rub it with olive oil and just salt and pepper.

I scored the squash after about 45 minutes in the oven so the butter and maple syrup would soak in a little. I finished baking it for about an hour total. That’s it. A tasty easy side.

Here is my favorite way to cook acorn squash. Scoop out the seeds and slice the squash in about 1/2 inch wedges. I like to make a rub of equal parts miso, maple syrup and olive oil and salt and pepper. You can just use olive oil and salt and pepper. Then spread the wedges evenly on a sheet pan and bake.

Start checking for doneness after about 35 – 40 minutes.

I had some romesco sauce I served with this. Pesto or chimichurri sauces are great with this, pretty much any sauces you have will work, or just eat it as is.

Look at the blisters and caramelization. Yum.

I hope you all are doing ok and are well and stay that way.

Mo

 

 

 

Posted in 2020, Recipes, Winter Squash

Winter CSA Week 2

Hello CSA Members!

Harvested Arugula

Here is what we *hope* to bring you for Week 2 of our Winter CSA:

REGULAR SHARE
Carrots
Cabbage
Topped Hakurei Turnips
Leafy Greens (Possibly Arugula OR Kale OR Chard)
Peppers CHOICE (Possibly Roasted Sweet Peppers OR Fresh Sweet Jimmy Nardello Peppers)
Winter Squash
One Extra Item (Possibly Brussel Sprouts OR Radicchio)

LARGE SHARE ADDITIONS
None for Winter CSA

FRUIT SHARE
Apples

Posted in 2020, Farm, Newsletter

Different kinds of winter squash-which are interchangeable?

Hello First Time Ever WINTER CSA Members!!

I’m super excited about the winter CSA. I love late season and storage vegetables. During the regular season CSA it feels like we are just getting started with late season food when the CSA ends mid October. This season the crew has planted 7 caterpillar tunnels and one hoop house for the winter CSA.  It’s going to be fun to see what comes out of them!

Lot’s of the food you will be getting was harvested before the frost and it has been carefully stored either in the barn or in the walk-in coolers. One of those crops that is now stored is the winter squash.

Clockwise these are buttercup, butternut, pie pumpkin (winter luxury), spaghetti, baby butternut and kabocha. We have lots and lots of information on this site about storing and cooking different kinds of squash.

Let’s look a little deeper into what makes them unique, and similar.

Kabocha (my favorite winter squash) and buttercup squash both have cork like stems and bright orange, very sweet and dry flesh. The shape stands up to braising in curries or stews and is delicious in soups, ravioli filling and they are dry enough to make squash gnocchi.  These two squash are completely interchangeable with each other and also with a sweet potato!  Kabocha skin is thin so I never peel it. Buttercup is a little thicker so I either peel it or scoop the flesh out and compost it.

Pie pumpkins and butternut squash are the two ubiquitous winter squash in most people’s repertoire. Almost any thing you can do with any winter squash you can safely substitute one of these. The flesh is orange, slightly firm, slightly stringy, slightly sweet, slightly nutty and not too dry especially if you roast them. I LOVE winter luxury pie pumpkins in this pie.

I love spaghetti squash but I always say I wish it had a different name. No, it doesn’t taste like spaghetti. It is stringy and very mild in taste, not sweet at all like other squash. It takes on the flavor of whatever you cook or serve it with. It has a chewy almost crisp texture that is sort of like rice vermicelli AND it comes with it’s own bowl! You can cook and eat your whole meal in one go! I can’t really think of anything you can substitute for or with spaghetti squash. In my experience this is the longest storing winter squash. I have kept a spaghetti squash from October to June! That’s 8 months!

One squash I don’t have on this list or even on this site is an acorn squash. I didn’t have one here today but I’ll find one at the farm this week and fix that!

Enjoy your winter vegetables and know they will keep for you for a long time.

Have a great week.

Mo

 

Posted in 2020, Recipes, Storage and Preparation, Winter Squash

Winter CSA Week 1

Hello CSA Members!

Early Morning Frosty Tuscan Kale

Here is what we *hope* to bring you for Week 1 of our Winter CSA:

REGULAR SHARE
Beets
Potatoes
Brussel Sprouts
Radicchio
Leafy Greens CHOICE (Possibly Bok Choi OR Kale OR Collard Greens)
Roasted Carmen Peppers
Winter Squash

LARGE SHARE ADDITIONS
None for Winter CSA

FRUIT SHARE
Apples

Posted in 2020, Farm, Newsletter